Video Presentations

April 14, 2014

I was recently asked if I could run some training for group of people who were intending creating some short 1 minute videos of their service offerings to go on their website. They had tried it once before a few years ago and weren’t very happy with the results.

This got me thinking about the similarities and the differences between standing up in front of a group of people and sitting down being videoed.

Using my standard OSRAM acronym for the main 5 aspects of a presentation, this is a summary of what I have concluded.

Objective

As anyone who has been on one of my courses or read my earlier blog entries will know I strongly believe that every presentation needs to have a good clear measurable objective accompanied by a call to action to enforce that objective.

Videos are no different. You need to have a clear idea of what you want people to do after they have watched the video, and how they should feel about you.

Speaker

Having a confident air is always the aim of a good presenter. Preparation and practise is vital to acquiring such confidence. This is even truer when it comes to making a video.

In a personal presentation your audience are likely to be quite sympathetic if you show any signs of being nervous, but will be less forgiving when watching a video. Any hesitations, errs & umms, poor pronunciation or grammatical errors will be far more noticeable on a video that in a live presentation. This is possibly because we are used to watching professional presenters on television. However, if you do make a mistake while filming don’t worry about it, just do it again, no-one will ever know.

There is always a first impression that the camera catches before you start speaking. Make sure you are relaxed and confident with a nice welcoming smile.

One of the main differences between presenting to an audience and presenting to camera is that you audience can see you very clearly. Every smile, every twitch or movement of the eyes will be seen and decoded. This means it is even more important to believe what you are saying and show them the honesty and passion behind your message. Being in the right state of mind to deliver a relaxed focussed message is crucial to get your audience to engage.

Room

My standard three rules for the room where you are presenting are:

  1. Get there early
  2. Make it tidy
  3. Think through the equipment you are using

The first of these is fairly irrelevant when making a video as your audience will watch it when they are ready. But the second and third rules are just as important.

When recording the video, make sure you are not wearing any fabric with detailed patterns on it, or close lines or tight stripes, as this can cause a fluttering effect on the recorded image that can be distracting in the final edit.

An uncluttered background works best for most videos.

There are two basic formats when presenting on video. One way is to look directly at the camera. The alternative is to speak to an invisible interviewer who is sitting next to the camera. Personally, I prefer the looking into the camera style. The trick here is not to stare. Imagine that the camera is actually the person to whom you are giving the presentation and that you are sitting having a chat.

This conversational style approach will be far more effective and welcoming than if you give a formal presentation. Each person who watches the video will engage with you one to one.

Audience

When you are recording a video you don’t have an audience but when some one watches the video they are your audience. That may seem rather trite and obvious but essentially what you have is a disconnect between you the presenter and your audience. Try to minimise this disconnect so that when someone watched the video they think you are talking directly to them.

As mentioned above the best way to do this is imagine that the camera is your audience member.

For example, if the target for your video is people who are about to retire and are interested in their pension options, imagine that the camera is a couple in their sixties, imagine how they are dressed, what they look like, what they are interested in, what worries and concerns they may have and then talk to them about how you can help them to maximise their retirement opportunities.

Message

Unlike many business presentations that can last for 40 minutes or more, a successful video is likely to be less than two minutes long. This means you have to be very succinct and to the point. As soon as you start to ramble people will stop watching.

However this does not mean you have to talk constantly in front of the camera. As with live presentations a variation in speed and tone helps to keep an audience engaged and pausing before an important point will help to enforce that point.

I never recommend using scripts which are read word for word when presenting. Cue cards or presenter view in PowerPoint is my preferred mechanism if you need a reminder as to what you are talking about. Cue cards will not look professional on a video so as it is only going to be a short presentation I would suggest just remembering it. If you do need reminders you could use an autocue or maybe just a large sheet of paper held up behind the camera with a few bullet points.

It really depends on how sophisticated the available equipment is, when you film your video. But if you are using idiot boards try reading them without taking your eyes off the camera, otherwise your audience will know that you were reading them.

All the Best

Graham Young

http://www.businesspresentation.biz


Two Approaches to Giving a Business Presentation

March 24, 2014

The Typical Approach to Giving
a Business Presentation

The Effective Approach
to Giving a Business Presentation

 

Always use bullet points in PowerPoint. By using bullet points everyone will understand you better because if they missed what you said, they can still read it on the slides.

 

Have striking visual aids with pictures which create strong mental images to back up what you are saying.

 

Start by telling them who you are and your company’s background, including turnover, locations, number of staff etc.

 

Start by grabbing their attention and telling them why they should listen.

 

Bring up each slide and tell people what it says.

 

Use the slides to reinforce what you have just said and help create a strong mental image

 

Use random slide transitions and animation to liven up your presentation

 

Use animation only if it helps to get your point across.

 

Have an agenda slide, at the start of each section, so that your audience knows exactly where you are in your presentation

 

Keep your audience listening; let them discover your message as it unfolds.

 

If you are using charts, create them in Excel and then copy them across with all of the labelling intact. This means that people will be able to understand the slides in detail when they look at them after your presentation.

 

Only display critical information on your charts. Keep them as simple as you can to get the point across. Use infographics.

Provide detailed information in a separate handout afterwards.

 

Apologise if you think a slide is too complex or unreadable

 

 

Never apologise, keep slides simple and to the point

 

Handouts are essential; always give out copies of your slides as handouts before you start.

 

Give out handouts after your presentation. Create a custom handout not a copy of your slides. Handouts and visual aids serve different purposes and need to be different.

 

 

If you’re nervous beforehand, drink lots of Irish coffee or a quick shot of tequila, you soon won’t notice the nerves.

 

If you are nervous, tell yourself you are doing it right, you are supposed to be nervous before an important presentation. Don’t worry about it.

 

 

Anyone who is a bit shy and doesn’t like looking people in the eye should give the presentation staring at a point on the back wall, or looking at the tops of people’s heads.

 

 

People can tell if you are not looking them in the eye, avoiding eye contact will stop an audience engaging with you. Make sure everyone gets some eye contact

 

Speaking quickly will enable you to get more information in to your allotted time.

 

Speak slightly more slowly then you would in a 1 to 1 conversation. Pause before an important point.

 

If you have interesting things to tell them most audiences won’t mind if you over run a bit.

 

Structure and practice your presentation to ensure you always end slightly early

 

Keep your hands still, if you find them waving about put both hands in your pockets.

 

Use positive body language to reinforce the words you are saying.

 

Don’t worry about remembering everything you are going to say, you can always look at your slides to remind you of the key points and any detailed data.

 

Never rely on the slides to remind you what to say. The presenter always leads the slides. If you can’t remember the points you need to make, use Presenter View in PowerPoint with appropriate speaker notes.

 

Emotions have no place in business so just stick to the facts, don’t be tempted to use emotional language as this can be misunderstood.

 

The emotion and passion you bring to a presentation is what distinguishes it from an email. Facts alone will rarely persuade anyone of anything

Give the same standard presentation to every audience. Your audience is the most important part of your presentation. Don’t say what you have to say, say what they want or need to hear.
 

In a sales presentation, tell them about all your products and services. You never know what might be of interest.

 

Find out what problems your audience have and tailored your presentation to meet their needs.

 

Humour is good in most presentations so start with a joke.

 

Humorous asides and comments can encourage audience engagement once you have built a level of trust, but never tell jokes.

 

Have a glass of water to hand, in case  you have a dry mouth.

 

If your mouth is dry suck a mint beforehand, or gently bite the inside of your cheeks to get the saliva flowing, don’t wash it away with water.

 

When presenting to an industry audience it is OK to use lots of jargon and technical terminology, after all they should all know what the TLA’s stand for.

 

Avoid using three letter abbreviations, and technical terms without explaining them first, just in case you audience are not familiar with them.

 

Always end a presentation by asking who has a question they would like answered.

 

Always end a presentation with a call to action, which tells your audience what you would like them to do next.

 

If in doubt just do what everyone else does, they will all be asleep anyway

 

Be different, stand out from the crowd, and make a lasting impression on your audience.

By Graham Young

http://www.businesspresentation.biz


The Presenter and The Visual Aid

February 17, 2014

One of the most common problems with presentations stems from the relationship between the presenter and their visual aids. The relationship between these two aspects of a presentation is fundamental to its success, and it is like the relationship between a man and his donkey.

donkey

Typically a man would use a donkey to help carry the load. Donkeys are very good at carrying heavy loads and are very sure-footed but they rarely know where to go so they must be lead by the man.

Similarly, visual aids can be very good at creating strong mental images which helps the presenter to communicate his or her message. However, the presenter must lead the visual aid.

All too often, presenters bring up the next slide before they start talking about the subject. This may be because they are relying on the slide to remind them what to talk about next, or it may be because they don’t know any better. This turns the whole process of giving a presentation on its head. The slides lead the presentation and the presenter is reduced to the role of explaining what the slides say.

The problem is that the audience look at the slide as soon as it comes up, if the slide is understandable then the audience will immediately know what the presenter is going to talk about. They very quickly decide whether or not they already know about this aspect of the presentation and decide whether to listen to the speaker or switch off.  This is made even worse if the slides contain a set of bullet points, which the audience can read.

While the slides, just like a donkey, can be the presenter’s beast of burden, conveying large amounts of information succinctly and successfully, hence relieving the presenter from having to describe everything in great detail, remember the slides need to be led by the presenter for the presentation to go in the right direction.

What load should your donkey carry?

To put it another way what are your slides for? Your visual aids should be exactly what it says on the tin. They should be something worth looking at and should help to get your message across.

Common mistakes with slides include using then as the speakers notes, which we have already covered above and using them as handouts after the presentation. Visual aids do not make good handouts. If your slides work well as a handout to be re-read after then event when you are no longer present, I can guarantee that they will not work well as visual aids. This is because visual aids need to be designed to accompany the spoken word, while handouts need to be designed as stand alone documents that work on their own without any additional words.

When can your donkey lead?

The only time that it is safe to display a visual aid, in advance of talking about the subject, is when the visual aid needs to be explained before is becomes meaningful. Creating visual aids of this nature can work very well, as when it is displayed they audience look at it and think “what is this all about?” and will immediately turn their attention back to the speaker of an explanation. Well designed animation has its part to play in this type of slide, so that the picture comes together through animation of the slide as the presenter tells the story.

All the very best with your future presentations

By Graham Young

http://www.businesspresentation.biz


Presentation Fireworks

November 4, 2013

fireworksAt this time of year (5th November) in the UK it is traditional to have a bonfire and a firework display to commemorate a 400 year old terrorist by the name of Guy Fawkes. Back in 1605 Guy Fawkes planned to blow up the House of Lords with barrels of gunpowder. Luckily for the members of parliament he was caught before he lit the fuse. It may seem odd to commemorate a failed terrorist in this way but that’s what we do.

Up and down the country large bonfires are lit with an effigy of Guy Fawkes on top and fireworks are let off. When I was a kid most people had bonfires and fireworks in their back gardens followed by baked potatoes roasted in the ashes of the fire. These days it is far more common to pay to attend a public firework display with hot dogs and hamburgers to eat.

But that’s enough of a history lesson the main point of this article to compare a business presentation with a firework display to see what tricks and tips we can learn from an organised firework display to help use with creating and giving a business presentation.

The Layout

One of the first things to consider is the layout of the arena. You want everyone to see the fireworks, in a presentation it is vital that everyone can see the speaker and the slides. The presenter is the most important visual aspect of a presentation, so stand where you can be seen.  Don’t hide behind a lectern.

The Start

Firework shows usually start with a big noisy rocket, that first bang tells everyone the show is starting and grabs their attention and sets the scene for the rest of the show. Similarly in a business presentation, you want to start with a bang. Say something impressive, which will grab your audience’s attention, make them think about your presentation topic and set the scene for the rest of the presentation. First impressions are important, imagine how you would feel if a firework display started by someone wandering around holding a sparkler.

The Middle

Firework displays are tightly choreographed with a variety of different types of fireworks, some with loud bangs, some screamers, others that are quieter but shoot high up into the sky before cascading down like glittering snow. Red, green, silver, blue and gold, all the colours of the rainbow provide a constantly changing and evolving spectacle. Variety is what keeps you interested when watching a display.

The same is true in your presentations. Once you have captured your audience’s attention you need to use variety to keep them interested. In a presentation variety is provided in a number of different ways. Don’t talk in a constant monotone voice, vary the pitch, the speed of delivery and the volume of your voice to add emphasis to the word you are saying.

Use different forms of anchor to make you main points more memorable. Anchors can be anecdotes, analogies, acronyms, activities, quotations, props or humorous asides.  Every main point you make in a presentation must be ”anchored” to make it more memorable but you should use different types of anchor for each different point, thereby increasing the variety inherent in your presentation.

As for your visual aids, pictures are more visually impressive than bullet points, especially pictures which fill the screen. Like fireworks big bold displays that fill the night sky are best.

By the way when have you ever seen an order of service or an agenda for a firework displays that sets out what you are going to see and hear in detail?  I think the same is true for a business presentation. Don’t start with an agenda slide. Keep some suspense and surprises in your presentation, it will encourage people to actually listen to find out what it is you are saying.

The End

All good firework displays build to a crescendo, finishing with the loudest, brightest, biggest and most spectacular fireworks.  How do your presentations end? Do they fizzle out with a question and answer session or that over used phrase “thank you for listening”.

The end of a presentation is the most important part as it is what people will be thinking about as they leave the room. Ideally you want to end with a clear and single call to action. Tell them exactly what they should do as a result of your presentation, then sit down and shut up.

As we say in the UK, I hope your next presentation goes with a bang!

All the Best

Graham Young

http://www.businesspresentation.biz


Take your Audience on a Journey

September 17, 2013

Most business presentations are about influencing, persuading and motivating people to do something, to take an action, to adopt a new way of thinking or to see things in a different light. That is why it is essential to end your presentation with a call to action. Your call to action tells your audience what you would like them to do next, in essence how to fulfill your objective for your presentation.

Everything in your presentation should lead your audience towards accepting the call to action. If you could just state your call to action and they would do it, then there would be no need for the  presentation. In effect the role of the presentation is to move your audience from where they are now, i.e. their current view of the world, to a new view where they are more likely to accept your call to action.

You are going to take your audience on a journey.  A journey of discovery that takes them from where they are now to where you want / need them to be.

Plan your route

Any long journey needs to be planned in advance. As the tour leader your travelling companions will expect you to have done your preparation and know where you are going and how to get there. So will your audience.

Know where you are going

When you start off on a journey it is usually advisable to know where you are heading. This is definitely true for a business presentation. You must have a clear, timely and measurable objective. You must know where you are taking your audience; otherwise you could end up just wasting their time and yours.

Know where they are coming from

Equally important is to know where your audience are coming from.  If you were organising a trip, there would be little point in starting it in Paris, if all your delegates lived in London. You need to know as much as possible about your audience including what they already know about your topic so that you can start in the right place. What knowledge and beliefs do they currently hold? Is there an “elephant in the room”? If so, you are best confronting it in your presentation rather than trying to detour round it.

It is also important is to judge what mood your audience are in, and start your presentation in line with that mood. There is no point cracking a joke at the start of a serious business presentation, the audience won’t be in the mood and you won’t get the reaction you were hoping for.

How are you going to travel?

On a real journey you need to decide what mode of transportation you are going to take, which may depend on the time you have available. Will it be car, bus, train or plane? Similarly for a presentation you need to decide what format you are going to use. Will it be just talking?  Or using slides? Maybe you will incorporate a video or some interactive activities to get the audience involved.

When I visited Florence recently, there were lots of tour guides walking around the town followed by crocodiles of tourists. Most of these tour guides held brightly coloured umbrellas so that their entourage could spot them and follow them through the crowded streets. How will your audience follow you through your presentation? After all you don’t want anyone getting lost. Have you got a prop you could use to help get your message across?

Straight from A to B

Sometimes when we are travelling we just want to get there as quickly and easily as possible. Straight from A to B without any deviations, hold ups or detours. In this case the travelling is just a necessary evil that has to be endured so that you can reach where you are going. Taking this approach for a presentation will ensure a very boring presentation that nobody will listen to.

As a tour guide you want to make the journey an experience in its own right, you want to make it interesting so that your audience enjoy the journey not just the destination. Rather than going straight from A to B and telling everyone, exactly how you are going to get there, how long it will take and what route you will be going on, you want to take you audience on a tour, tell them about the points of interest on route, interact with them and maybe even lead a sing along.

Again, the same is true with a presentation. Taking your audience from A to B in a straight line and telling them exactly where you are going and how you are going to get there enables the audience to get ahead of you. You have just told them what you are going to be talking about and if they think that they have heard it all before or aren’t interested they will just stop listening.

In your presentation, you need to build in some points of interest to talk about, you should make it more of a mystery tour, so that they have to listen in order to find out where you are taking them.

Knowledgeable and Concise

Fairly obviously, if you are giving a presentation you need to know what you are talking about, just as a tour guide needs to know about the locations they are travelling through and the history of the places. But you don’t need to tell everybody everything you know about the subject. Keep it concise and to the point. If you audience wants to know more they can always ask questions.

What to do when you arrive

When you arrive at the end of your journey the most important things that a tour guide will do is tell you what to do next, before they leave you to your own devices. At the end of a presentation the most important thing for you to do is to state your call to action. Tell your audience what you would like them to do, in light of all the information you have given them in your presentation. Then sit down and shut up and wait for them to do it.

Bon voyage!

Graham Young

http://www.businesspresentation.biz


Seeing is believing – The McGurk Effect

September 12, 2013

I recently cam across a BBC Horizon video clip on YouTube about the McGurk Effect which adds more weight to the argument that what you see overrules what you hear when giving a presentation.

Watch the video and you will see how our visual sense takes precedence over what we are hearing. This is another example of “It ain’t what you say” in your presentation that matters and it also highlights why it is important that your audience is able to see you clearly. So no more hiding behind lecterns.

The human brain is a wonderful, complex, organ which interprets a wide range of different stimuli, often subconsciously, to decode the communication that it is receiving, when you listen to a presentation. As a presenter you need to make sure that all these different stimuli are giving a strong consistent message otherwise you may inadvertently mislead you audience. You will say one thing and they will interpret it as something else.

All the Best

Graham Young

http://www.businesspresentaion.biz

 

 

 


A brief history of slide design

July 30, 2013

Slides or visual aids  have changed significantly over the years. Ignoring the blackboard, whiteboard and flipchart which have been used for mainly hand drawn visual aids, the introduction of slides to support a presentation started with the use of 35mm slides.  These were prepared, usually by specialists well in advance of a presentation. They were expensive to produce and once created could never be changed.

Overhead Projectors

The first main revolution in slides came with the overhead projector. This enabled individuals to create their own slides, either hand drawn or printed using transparencies and a photocopier. Creating slides was still a fairly time consuming process and most slides were monochrome and textual.

A typical slide showing the three keys to good health might look something like this:

Slide3

Notice it is very text heavy with all the detail spelt out. Individual bullet points could be revealed one at a time by placing a sheet of paper under the transparency and pulling it down, point by point.

PowerPoint

Initially PowerPoint was used mainly to create the slide layouts for Overhead projector transparencies, but as technology developed an LCD tablet mounted on an overhead projector allowed slides to be viewed directly from the computer. Not only did this speed up the whole process of creating a visual aid, but they could now easily be created using colour and the omnipresent clip art.

Slide5

As corporate marketing departments became involved in the production of slides for staff to use then corporate branding became more important. Slides had to comply to a predefined format and display the company’s logo. Individuals were no longer free to use which ever of the many standard templates provided by PowerPoint they chose. In some ways the creation of a corporate standard was a good thing mainly because it limited the use of over zealous animation and slide transitions, which had started to detract from the content of the visual aids.

Corporate Branding

standard course

As the processing power and storage capabilities of the standard PC improved it became more and more practical to include photo quality images in a presentation, this co-incided with the advent of the internet, enabling images to be found and shared easily. Clip art became out dated and old fashioned.

Using Images

Slide3

De-Cluttering

In the above example, we still have the same corporate layout and all the main text is still present but now it has been augmented by an image. Often people would keep the bullet points they had become used to using but add a photograph on one side of the slide. However, in attempts to de-clutter their slides and make the most of the images many people decided to dump the corporate formats and concentrate on making the slide content as visible as possible and remove anything that may distract the viewer from their key message.. As in the following example:

Slide7

Keep it Simple

Current thinking has taken this idea of “keeping it simple” even further. There is now a the idea of only having one idea per slide and minimizing the amount of text shown on a slide. After all if the presenter is saying the words, why do people need to read them as well. Contrary to popular belief, people can’t actually multitask very well, so if the audience are reading the slide they are not listening to what the presenter is saying and vice versa.

One idea One Slide

This concept means that the visual aids to accompany a presentation on the “Basis for Good Health” might now consist of three slides rather than one and look more like this:

Slide4

Slide5

Slide6

However, this may be too simplistic. After all the topic is good health, rather than each of the contributors to good health, so you may prefer to bring them all back together like this:

good health

Visual aids have evolved in line with the capability and capacity of available technology.  Adding video clips and live twitter feeds into a presentation is now common place along with other technologies which encourage audience participation. As long as it is implemented in such a way that it continues to add to what the speaker is saying rather than distract the audience, I think any such improvements should be applauded.

Remember the purpose of visual aids is to add value to what the speaker is saying not replace the speaker or repeat what he/she has just said.

Finally, don’t forget that your visual aids don’t have to be slides at all, they can just as easily be physical objects.

All the best

Graham Young

http://www.businesspresentation.biz


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 391 other followers

%d bloggers like this: